Uganda Ebola Report

Uganda is Ebola and Marburg Viruses Free

Zero Risk of Transmission in Uganda and the Rest of East African Destinations

Outbreak Map Distribution and Distances

Africa A continent not a country

Press Release October 15th, 2014

Health Status of Uganda

Uganda Tourism Board informs all visitors, travellers and tourists, domestic and international that the Health status of the country is okay contrary to some media reports.

On 28th September 2014, one case of the Marburg hemorrhagic fever was reported and the people closest to this individual were immediately quarantined. Results after screening them confirmed negative of the Marburg virus and they still remain under the watch of health professionals.

As a country, we pride in the safety of all our visitors, tourists and nationals both in safety and health issues. To this effect, the Ministry of Health has urged members of the public to avoid unnecessary body contact such as handshakes.

We further wish to reiterate that Uganda is Ebola-free and to-date not a single case has been reported within our borders.

Whereas we pledge to keep all our visitors and travelers informed about the situation in the country, we also urge the media to report accurately and encourage visitors to come to our country.

Uganda Tourism Board
Plot 42, Windsor Crescent, Kololo
Tel: 0414 342 196/7 or Fax: 0414 342 188 E: utb@tourismuganda.info

Press Release August 26th, 2014

UGANDA IS EBOLA FREE

Uganda Tourism Board wishes to clarify that Uganda is Ebola free and no case has been reported within the borders of the country contrary to some media reports.

Whereas the country is on high alert, UTB wishes to inform all travelers, tourists, travel agencies, the general public and the international community that not a single case of Ebola has been recorded in Uganda.

The affected areas are far away from Uganda and the government of Uganda has set up screening sites at all borders of the country for travelers from affected regions and any suspected cases as precautionary endeavors.

We therefore wish to assure all tourists and visitors to Uganda of an Ebola free destination. We will keep all our visitors and travelers informed about the situation in the country.

For more information please contact
Uganda Tourism Board
Plot 42, Windsor Crescent, Kololo
Tel: 0414 342 196/7 or Fax: 0414 342 188
E: utb@tourismuganda.info or agneskemigisa@tourismuganda.info

Rwanda Remains Ebola Free

Press Release Kigali, Sunday 28th September 2014

The Ministry of Health would like to inform Rwandans and all visitors to Rwanda that Rwanda is Ebola free. The lab results of the patient who was reported in the media this past week were negative for the Ebola Virus Disease.

The government has put in place measures aimed at protecting Rwandans from Ebola. Surveillance systems and emergency management systems are in place. Health workers have been trained across the country and are vigilant.

Together with partners, the Ministry of Health has increased sensitization measures about Ebola virus disease through the media and community outreach activities. All this will enable timely detection, notification and appropriate management of any suspected cases to safeguard Rwandans. The Ministry will always provide credible information on any case that is considered a public health threat.

For More information contact: RBC-Rwanda Health Communication E-mail, info@rbc.gov.rw or call Nathan Mugume Tel: +250788567373

Questions and Answers on Ebola (Extracted From AAR - Insurance Health Care)

The 2014 Ebola outbreak is the largest Ebola outbreak in history and the first in West Africa. The current outbreak is affecting four countries in West Africa: Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone and does pose a significant risk to all countries in the region.

A small number of cases in Nigeria have been associated with a man from Liberia who travelled to Lagos and died from Ebola, but the virus does not appear to have been widely spread. We have had cases reported in Congo and Senegal in the past few days.

What is Ebola?

Ebola, also known as Ebola virus disease, is a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains (Zaire, Sudan, Bundibugyo, or Tai Forest virus). Ebola viruses are found in several African countries. Ebola was discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically in several African countries.

What are the signs and symptoms of Ebola?

Signs and symptoms of Ebola include fever (greater than 38.6°C or 101.5°F) and severe headache,
muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain,
or unexplained bleeding or bruising. Signs and symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, although 8 to 10 days is most common.

How is Ebola spread?

The virus is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with blood and body fluids (urine, faeces, saliva, vomit, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola, or with objects (like needles) that have been contaminated with the virus. Ebola is not spread through the air or by water or, in general, by food; however, in our region, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bush meat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

Who is most at risk of getting Ebola?

Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in direct contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients.

In some places affected by the current outbreak, care may be provided in clinics with limited resources (for example, no running water, no climate control, no floors, inadequate medical supplies), and workers could be in those areas for several hours with a number of Ebola infected patients. Additionally, certain job responsibilities and tasks, such as attending to dead bodies, may also require different PPE than what is used when providing care for infected patients in a hospital.

Can I get Ebola from a person who is infected but doesn't have fever or any symptoms?

No. A person infected with Ebola is not contagious until symptoms appear.

If someone survives Ebola, can he or she still spread the virus?

Once someone recovers from Ebola, they can no longer spread the virus. However, Ebola virus has been found in semen for up to 3 months. People who recover from Ebola are advised to abstain from sex or use condoms for 3 months.

Can Ebola be spread through mosquitoes?

There is no evidence that mosquitoes or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys and apes) have shown the ability to spread and become infected with Ebola virus.

Treatment

How is Ebola treated?

No specific vaccine or medicine has been proven to cure Ebola. Signs and symptoms of Ebola are treated as they appear. The following basic interventions, when used early, can increase the chances of survival.

Providing fluids and electrolytes

Maintaining oxygen status and blood pressure

Treating other infections if they occur

Early recognition of Ebola is important for providing appropriate patient care and preventing the spread of infection. Healthcare providers should be alert for and evaluate any patients suspected of having Ebola.

Prevention

How do I protect myself against Ebola?

If you are in or travelling to an area affected by the Ebola outbreak, protect yourself by doing the following:

Wash hands frequently.

Avoid contact with blood and body fluids of any person, particularly someone who is sick.

Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person's blood or body fluids.

Do not touch the body of someone who has died from Ebola.

Do not touch bats and nonhuman primates or their blood and fluids and do not touch or eat raw meat prepared from these animals.

Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated.

Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 101.5oF/ 38.6oC) and any of the other following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.

Limit your contact with other people until and when you go to the doctor. Do not travel anywhere else besides a healthcare facility.

CDC has issued a Warning, Level 3 travel notice for three countries. People should avoid all nonessential travel to Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. CDC has issued an Alert, Level 2 travel notice for Nigeria. Travellers to Nigeria should take enhanced precautions to prevent Ebola.

Infection Control

Can hospitals in our region care for an Ebola patient?

Any hospital in the region that is following CDC's infection control recommendations and can isolate a patient in their own room‎ with a private bathroom is capable of safely managing a patient with Ebola.

These patients need intensive supportive care; any hospital that has this capability can safely manage these patients.

Standard, contact, and droplet precautions are recommended.

How can healthcare providers protect themselves?

Healthcare providers can take several infection control measures to protect themselves when dealing with Ebola patients.

Anyone entering the patient's room should wear at least gloves, a gown, eye protection (goggles or a face shield), and a facemask.

Additional personal protective equipment (PPE) might be needed in certain situations (for example, when there is a lot of blood, vomit, faeces, or other body fluids).

Healthcare providers should frequently perform hand hygiene before and after patient contact, contact with potentially infectious material, and before putting on and after removing PPE, including gloves.

What do I do if I'm returning to my country from the area where the outbreak is occurring?

After you return, pay attention to your health.

Monitor your health for 21 days if you were in an area with an Ebola outbreak, especially if you were in contact with blood or body fluids, items that have come in contact with blood or body fluids, animals or raw meat, or hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated or participated in burial rituals.

Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 38.6oC) and any he following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.

Tell your doctor about your recent travel and your symptoms before you go to the office or emergency room. Advance notice will help your doctor care for you and protect other people who may be in the office.

What do I do if I am travelling to an area where the outbreak is occurring?

If you are travelling to an area where the Ebola outbreak is occurring, protect yourself by doing the following:

Wash your hands frequently.

Avoid contact with blood and body fluids of any person, particularly someone who is sick.

Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person's blood or body fluids.

Do not touch the body of someone who has died from Ebola.

Do not touch bats and nonhuman primates or their blood and fluids and do not touch or eat raw meat prepared from these animals.

Seek medical care immediately if you develop fever (temperature of 101.5oF/ 38.6oC) and any of the other following symptoms: headache, muscle pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach pain, or unexplained bruising or bleeding.

Limit your contact with other people until and when you go to the doctor. Do not travel anywhere else besides a healthcare facility.

Uganda Team Takes Ebola Experience To Liberia (WHO) Click to Read

Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Mountain gorillas are the largest living primates and the world's most endangered apes with a population of less than 800 individuals world over- none in zoos. They are found in Uganda, Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

They share 97% DNA with human beings! They are our closest living cousins after the Chimpanzee, They have up to 25 vocalization for communication

Mountain Gorillas are shy, social and very active during day. They live in families of 8-25 members with one leading male (The Silver Back).

Gorillas have a lifespan of 50 years in the wild. They reproduce at a very slow speed with a gestation period of approximately 8.5 months and an interval of four years to the next birth.

Diet: Mainly herbivores eating fruits, herbs, leaves, stems, roots and shoots. Sometimes ingest small insects like ants and termites.

Grauer's Broadbill (Pseudocalyptomena graueri)

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Aves, Family: Eurylaimidae, Genus: Pseudocalyptomena, Species: Pseudocalyptomena graueri

The Grauer's Broadbill or African Green Broadbill (Pseudocalyptomena graueri) is an actual broadbill, one of only a few African representatives of a primarily Asian family. It is bright green with a blue throat and vent and a small bill, quite unlike those of the other broadbills. It is endemic to the Albertine Rift Mountains of Uganda and Democratic Republic of Congo. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests where it forages in canopies.

It is one of the African Big Five bird species, highly sought after by ornithologists but very elusive.

The species is both globally endangered and endangered according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

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