Shoebill Tour at Mabamba Uganda

Shoebill

This is the nearest place to meet the historical and incomparable Shoebill in Uganda and probably the best place to find the bird in the world after Murchison Falls National Park of Uganda. After breakfast, your birding experience to the Mabamba Swamps will start. Birding here is done canoeing on a big scale if you are to see the Shoebill.

A variety of species for your eyes to catch sight of might include; The elusive Shoebill, Papyrus Gonolek, White-faced Whistling-duck, Fulvours Whistling Duck, Goliath Heron, Purple Heron, Common Squacco Heron, long-toed Plover, African water Rail, Grey and Black Headed Herons, Striated Heron, Pygmy Goose, Yellow Billed Duck, Black Crake, Swamp Moorhen, Allen's Gallinule, African Jacana, Rufous-naped Lark, Flappet Lark, Mosque Swallow (monteiri race), Weyn's Weaver, White Shouldered Tit, Sand Martin, Brown Snake-Eagle, Eurasian Hobby, Troppical Boubou, Stripped Kingfisher, Common Stonechat, Little bee-eater, Red-chested Cuckoo, Klass’s Cuckoo, Diedrick Cuckoo, White-browed and the Senagal Coucals, Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird, Yellow white-eye, common and black-capped Waxbill and over a hundred other bird species are a must see for a hard core or lucky birder. There is also the Sitatunga, a swamp antelope and on a lucky day it will be seen.

Tour Highlights

Departs: Entebbe | Kampala Tour Length: 1 Day Focus: Birding Key Species: Shoebill Stork, Lesser Jacana , Papyrus Gonolek, Northern Brown-throated Weaver, Orange Weaver Expected # of birds: 80 Species Birding Pace: Simple Physical Difficulty: Simple Group Limit: Maximum 8 Bird Photography: High Chances

End of Mabamba Swamp birding excursion.

Shoebill Tour at Mabamba Uganda

Greater Blue-eared Starling (Lamprotornis chalybaeus)

The Greater Blue-eared Starling is among the starlings with short tails. Grows to up to 23 cm from bill to tail.

Sexes are similar except the immature which is generally duller compared to the iridescent blue-green coloured adult.

They nest in holes in trees, either natural or excavated by woodpeckers. And sometimes in large stick nests of the Sacred Ibis or Abdim's Stork. Here they lay 3 to 5 eggs which are greenish-blue with some brown or purple spots, and hatch in 13–14 days. The chicks leave the nest in another 23 days.

Greater Blue-eared Starlings are omnivore, taking a wide range of invertebrates seeds and berries, especially figs, but insects are the main diet.

White-throated Bee-eater (Merops albicollis)

The very gregarious White-throated Bee-eaters grow to 19–21 cm length, excluding the tail streamers, which can exceed an additional 21 cm length.

Sexes are similar and weigh between 20 and 28 grams.

White-throated Bee-eaters breeds in dry sandy open country, where nest colonially in sandy banks or open flat areas. They make a relatively long 1–2 m tunnel in which 6 to 7 spherical white eggs are laid. Both the male and the female take care of the eggs, but up to five helpers also assist with caring for the young.

Predominantly, they eat insects, especially bees, wasps, ants, beetles and hornets, which are caught in the air by sorties from an open perch.

Great Blue Turaco (Corythaeola cristata)

Turacos are a group of African near-passerines. The Great Blue Turaco is the largest turaco and also the largest species in the diverse Cuculiformes order (which includes the cuckoos).

Generally, the Great Blue Turaco is 70–76 cm in length with a mass of 800–1,231 g. In the Bandundu province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Great Blue Turaco is actively hunted for meat and feathers. The blue and yellow tail feathers are prized for making good luck talismans.

Woodland Kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis)

This brightly coloured medium-sized Kingfisher ranges from 20 - 23 cm, from bill tip to tail.

The bird is endemic to Africa, preferring a variety of wooded habitats with some trees, especially Acacias, including around human habitation. The Woodland Kingfisher is aggressively territorial, attacking intruders including humans. It has a striking display in which the wings are spread to show the white linings.

They nest in tree holes excavated by Woodpeckers or Barbets, where they lay up to three round white eggs.

Grauer's Broadbill (Pseudocalyptomena graueri)

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Aves, Family: Eurylaimidae, Genus: Pseudocalyptomena, Species: Pseudocalyptomena graueri

The Grauer's Broadbill or African Green Broadbill (Pseudocalyptomena graueri) is an actual broadbill, one of only a few African representatives of a primarily Asian family. It is bright green with a blue throat and vent and a small bill, quite unlike those of the other broadbills. It is endemic to the Albertine Rift Mountains of Uganda and Democratic Republic of Congo. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests where it forages in canopies.

It is one of the African Big Five bird species, highly sought after by ornithologists but very elusive.

The species is both globally endangered and endangered according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

TOP